Clan History

Doherty Clan History

 

Wikipedia states:

The Doherty family (Irish: Clann Dhochartaigh) is an Irish clan based in County Donegal in the north of the island of Ireland.

Like clans in other cultures, Irish clans such as the Dohertys are divided into many septs and regional families. In the modern day, there are 140 noted variations in spelling of the name Ó Dochartaigh, of which Doherty (with or without the "Ó") is the most common anglicisation.

The Dohertys are named after Dochartach, the 12th in linear descent from Conall Gulban (d. AD 455), the son of the famous Niall of the Nine Hostages (Niall Noigíallach) the 5th Century High King of Ireland, and namesake of the powerful Uí Néill dynasty. Through Niall, the Dohertys can trace their heritage back even further, making the clan one of Europe’s longest descent lines. The origins of the family however, as with the Irish people and their ancestors, the Gaels, are obscured by Celtic mythology and folk tales.

The later chiefs of the clan, elected by tanistry under the Brehon Laws, were called the Lords of Inishowen as they were pushed from their original territory in the Laggan valley area of present-day Donegal, into the vacuum left by the end of Mac Lochlainn rule in the northernmost peninsula of the island of Ireland.

 

 “The Dohertys are named after Dochartach (fl. 10th century), a member of the Cenél Conaill dynasty which in medieval Irish genealogy traced itself to Niall of the Nine Hostages (see Uí Néill).

The later chiefs of the clan, elected by tanistry under the Brehon Laws, were called the Lords of Inishowen as they were pushed from their original territory in the Laggan valley area of present-day Donegal, into the vacuum left by the end of Mac Lochlainn rule in the northernmost peninsula of the island of Ireland.

Modern history

Following the Flight of the Earls in 1607, the chief of the Dohertys, Cahir O'Doherty, rose up in the following year against English domination in Ireland and the plantation of Protestant settlers in what is known as Ó Dogherty’s Rebellion. Provoked by the English Governor, Cahir and his followers attacked Derry and burned several castles before ultimately being defeated. After this loss, Cahir was killed in 1608 and the family lost much of its power and influence. By 1784, the leading branch of the family fled the country. The chiefs have been absent from Ireland ever since.”

 

Irish Central website covers some Doherty Clan history:

The Annals of the Four Masters in 1413 record that Conor O'Doherty is Lord of Inishowen. To protect the narrow land-access to the peninsula, the O'Dohertys built the castles of Enagh, Burt and Inch. The O'Dohertys lost control of their territories following a foolhardy rebellion by Sir Cahir O'Doherty; however, they still remained the predominant family in the area. In the Griffith survey of land-holdings, conducted in 1857, there were over 2,000 (O) Doherty land-holdings in County Donegal, and many hundreds in the neighboring county of Derry.

Although the name O'Doherty is very closely associated with Donegal, it is also found in great numbers in several other counties, particularly the Northern counties. After Cromwell's suppression of the Rebellion of the Catholic Confederacy in 1649, many O'Doherty estates in Donegal were confiscated and the rightful owners were resettled in the North of County Mayo.

During the 1798 rebellion, a French force landed in this area to help the insurgents, among them one Pat Dogherty, who is recorded as being "a noted rebel". The Dohertys first settled in Kerry in 1601, when the army of O'Neill, which included the allied O'Dohertys, marched through on their way to help the Spanish force that landed at Kinsale. Some of the O'Dohertys remained behind to help the local chiefs and never returned to Donegal.

Today the name is fairly common throughout Ireland. Prominent O'Dohertys in history include Sir Cahir O'Doherty (1587-1608), who, like his predecessor, was Lord of Inishowen. Unlike many of his clan, he sided with the English forces after the departure of O'Neill and his allies in 1607. He was thus able to retain control of O'Doherty lands and was knighted and made Alderman of Derry City in recognition of his support. However, he gradually developed an enmity with Governor Paulet of Derry.

In 1608 Paulet struck him in a dispute over a land sale and in revenge, Sir Cahir O'Doherty attacked and burned Derry, killing Paulet and destroying his garrison. After a short period of rebellion, the gallant but foolish Sir Cahir was shot by the English Army sent out to capture him. Subsequently, the O'Doherty lands were confiscated and granted to the Chichester family who planted the area with settlers.

Eighty years later the Irish Army, which supported the Catholic King James II, included Lieutenant Con O'Doherty of Colonel Cormac O'Neill's Infamous Regiment. In the same army was Henry O'Doherty (1660-17?), who was secretary to Patrick Sarsfield, hero of the Jacobite army at the Seige of Limerick, who helped in the drafting of the famous Treaty of Limerick.

 

Read more: http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/The-Doherty-ODoherty-clan.html#ixzz1uwM5jkjx